64 results found

  • Ng’ambo Tuitakayo | aamatters

    Ng’ambo Tuitakayo CategorY , , , Research Community Urban planning Event ​ Period 2013 - 2016 ​ AAmatters team Antoni Folkers Berend van der Lans Marie Morel Iga Perzyna Alexandra Papadaki Amelie Chauvin Aurora Kazi Bassett Nicole Bolomey ​ Partners /Collaborators DoURP UNESCO City of Amsterdam Stadsherstel Amsterdam NV Royal Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands ​ Relevant links facebook page Local news article 1 Local news article 2 ​ tags #placemaking #intangible heritage #tangible heritage #urban planning #finding stories #bottom up Relevant projects Ng’ambo Atlas Finding Stories Ng’ambo Housing Research Learning from Casablanca Coen Beeker The Government of Zanzibar has recently developed National Spatial Planning Strategies and is in the process of implementing them. One of the key focuses is to develop specific policy and instruments for urban planning and maintenance based on heritage, since Zanzibar has a rich history that is still clearly demonstrated in tangible and intangible forms. Most significant and world famous is Stone Town, recognised by UNESCO as World Heritage Site. ​ Just like Zanzibar, the City of Amsterdam shares the responsibility over a World Heritage Site (the Seventeenth Century Canal Ring). In Amsterdam, a balanced alliance of public and private parties plays an important role in maintaining the historic character of the city while there is space for development. It is a good example of the Historic Urban Landscape (HUL) approach, developed by UNESCO for the regeneration of historic urban areas. The Government of Zanzibar has adopted the HUL approach and aims to implement this. ​ Few years ago, Zanzibar and Amsterdam started explorations on collaboration with the aim to assist in the development of policies and instruments for heritage based urban regeneration in Zanzibar. Through action these policies and instruments were further shaped. Ng’ambo Tuitakayo (Swahili for ‘The Ng’ambo we want’) is one of the projects that was developed from this collaboration. The first explorations were condensed in a pilot project in a small area of Ng’ambo, together with UNESCO in 2014. The HUL methodology - a holistic and integrated approach for heritage based urban regeneration – was tested through workshops with the community and led to a basis for upscaling the approach for the whole Ng’ambo project area. In 2015, with support from the Netherlands Enterprise Agency, a project was set up between the Government of Zanzibar and the Municipality of Amsterdam that aimed to develop a Local Area Plan and Structure Plan for Ng’ambo on the basis of the HUL approach. Ng'ambo Tuitakayo involved resident communities and all relevant stakeholders in the area just outside of Stone Town in the development of the Local Area Plan for the area that in the recently developed Master Plan for Zanzibar is earmarked as future city centre of Zanzibar. The first months were used for an intensive mapping exercise that formed a first basis for the plan. After the symposium ‘Finding Stories’, that was organised in connection with a workshop in Amsterdam in January 2016 and brought together experts on implementation of community consultation, the intangible mapping exercise was rolled out. The Local Area Plan has been developed and is presented to the inhabitants of Ng’ambo during a public presentation festival in the heart of the area in June 2016. It has been adopted by the Government of Zanzibar for implementation and is now forming the basis for all future developments in the area. A first important step is the development of the Karume Boulevard following the LAP, with support of the World Bank. ​ African Architecture Matters was approached to assist in this process and has been coordinating it from the initiation, as well as providing input as a knowledge base. Together with local and international students and graduates from a broad and multi-disciplinary background and employees of the Department of Urban and Rural Planning, a strong project team was formed that contributed to the end results. A steering committee was lead by Mwalim A. Mwalim (Government of Zanzibar) and was consisting further of Dr. Muhammad Juma (director DoURP), Dr. Aart Oxenaar, Ruwan Aluvihare, Keimpe Reitsma, Sabine Gimbrère (all Municipality of Amsterdam) and Paul Morel (Stadsherstel). ​ Currently the team is preparing a publication that presents the mapping results of Ng’ambo and the approach that was followed. The will be presented in the fall of 2017. Ng’ambo Atlas back to the projects overview

  • Institut fur Tropenbau | aamatters

    Institut fur Tropenbau CategorY Research ​ Period 2010 - date ​ AAmatters team Antoni Folkers Antie Kaan Lot Bakker ​ Partners /Collaborators Canadian Centre for Architecture ​ Relevant links Announcement Master programme ​ tags #architecture #urban planning #library #archive #urbanism Relevant projects Coen Beeker Modern Architecture in Africa back to the projects overview The Institut fur Tropenbau (Institute for Building in the Tropics) was a knowledge centre on building in the tropic, set up by Georg Lippsmeier in the 1960’s. In the 22 years of its active existence, an extensive and valuable library has been built up. This library was inherited by AAmatters and is now being make accessible worldwide in collaboration with the Canadian Centre for Architecture. Georg Lippsmeier was born in 1923 in Magdeburg. Georg enrolled at the Technische Hochschule Braunschweig (Brunswick) for architectural studies straight after the end of the war in 1945. He completed his studies with a PhD on ecclesial architecture in 1949. In 1950 Lippsmeier established his own practice, later internationally known as L+P Architects. In 1960, Lippsmeier and his family moved to Starnberg in Bavaria, where he opened a second office. Around the same time, Lippsmeier’s interest for tropical architecture was roused, resulting in a large amount of designed and built projects in the tropics. Lippsmeier would become the most successful German tropical architect from the 1960s to the 1990s. The office of L+P Architects has signed for an impressive amount of design and building projects in the tropics; in the Far East (Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia), in Asia (India, Pakistan), in Middle America (El Salvador, Guatemala, Trinidad) and, particularly, in Africa. From the offices in Düsseldorf and Starnberg, satellite- or field-offices were established in many of these countries, some for the duration of the specific projects, others to last for longer periods and becoming semi-independent practices by themselves. Such offices existed over time in Togo, Vietnam, Trinidad, Kenya, Senegal and Tanzania, amongst others. Lippsmeier’s interest in the tropics eventually lead to the establishment, in 1969, of the Institut für Tropenbau, the Institute for Tropical Building (IFT), that was housed in the Starnberg office of L+P Architects. The IFT consisted of part-time researchers, often architect-employees of L+P Architects, under the direction of Georg Lippsmeier. The group researched and published on a wide range of topics related to tropical architecture and urbanism, with an emphasis on building technology, climate design and housing the urban poor, commencing with the publication of the book Tropenbau -- Building in the Tropics in 1969, which would become one of the major international textbooks for architects and students aspiring to work in the tropics during the 1970s to 1990s. During its lifetime, the IFT built up a unique research library and images collection, on which much of the research and publications were based. Most of the research work and writing at the IFT was carried out by L+P Architects’ staff, with the exception of Kiran Mukerji, who was employed directly by the IFT. Mukerji was employed as researcher and author from 1973 to 1985. He was the main force in the building up and documentation of the research library and (co)author of almost all works published during his employment. Mukerji left the IFT to become independent researcher and consultant in 1985, which he remained until his retirement. The IFT activities slowed down after Mukerji’s departure, and came to final standstill at Lippsmeier’s death in 1991. Notwithstanding Lippsmeier lifelong investment in research and publications on tropical architecture, German expertise on tropical architecture was in the end not really a marketable commodity. It could be said that the IFT was Lippsmeier’s ultimate mission in life, which he supported with the finance and personal capacities that he had gathered in his architectural practice. In 2007, the collection still was completely intact, when the inheritance was discussed with Antoni Folkers, who once worked for Lippsmeier and the IFT as well. Folkers, as one of the key members of ArchiAfrika at that time, proposed to bring IFT under the umbrella of ArchiAfrika and aim to make the unique collection of books, publications, documents, drawings, slides and maps accessible for scholars and researchers worldwide. The son of Georg Lippsmeier, Ulrich Lippsmeier – who continued the practice after the passing away of his father – agreed to the handover and in the fall of 2007 the collection was moved to the Netherlands. Other collections joint the IFT, like the Kiran Mukerji and Coen Beeker collections. Over the years the collections were checked and made accessible under Antoni Folkers’ supervision. It served various scholars, practitioners and students in their research. When ArchiAfrika shifted its base to Accra, it was commonly decided that the IFT would remain with AAmatters in Europe, out of practical reasons – close to Folkers with the most extensive knowledge on the archives - and it was thought the best location to guarantee the widest accessibility of the material. AAmatters however had limited means to make this work and in 2016 a collaboration with the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), much better equipped for this, started to open up the collections widely. The collections have been moved to the CCA in the fall of 2016 and together with AAmatters a programme is prepared to make further study of the collections and make it accessible worldwide. In the coming year a seminar will be organised in collaboration with the 2 institutes. In the summer of 2017 a first study has been completed, of which the results will be shared soon.

  • Zanzibar Local Area Plans | aamatters

    Zanzibar Local Area Plans CategorY , Urban and rural planning Consultancy ​ Period 2014 - 2020 ​ AAmatters team Antoni Folkers Berend van der Lans Alexandra Papadaki ​ Partners /Collaborators Department of Urban and Rural Planning (DoURP) Government of Zanzibar NIRAS Finland (client) ​ tags #urban planning #rural planning #visions #consultancy #guidelines Relevant projects Ng'ambo Tuitakayo North East Unguja Special Area Plan The Department of Urban and Rural Planning in Zanzibar has taken up the task of producing Local Area Plans for specific areas on Pemba and Unguja islands. This is the first time in history that these areas have become subject of any planning activity. The Local Area Plans are structure plans that define development strategies to be followed and specific development management proposals and policies applicable to both private developers and the authorities. ​ The first Local Area Plan was for Mkokotoni Town, and old fishing port on the western coast of Unguja island, followed by plans for Nungwi, Chwaka, Kiwengwa, Pongwe, Makunduchi as well as a special Local Area Plan is formed for Zanzibar's Town new city centre. back to the projects overview

  • akb | aamatters

    aurora kazi bassett It was so great to see projects move from thinking, talking and writing to doing something and implementation. history of cities and city planning / project manager Aurora Kazi Bassett (1988) was raised between New York City and Harare and received her undergraduate degree in the history of cities from Stanford University and a Master in City Planning degree in the International Development Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 2017. She has been working with AAmatters since she met the team in 2014 in Zanzibar. projects involved Aurora worked on the Ng’ambo Tuitakayo project, as a program manager with Hifadhi Zanzibar and on a number of nascent AAmatters projects. back to the team overview

  • Ng’ambo Atlas | aamatters

    Ng’ambo Atlas CategorY , Research Publication ​ Period 2016 - 2017 ​ AAmatters team Antoni Folkers Iga Perzyna Marie Morel Alexandra Papadaki Amelie Chauvin Berend van der Lans ​ Partners /Collaborators Department of Urban and Rural Planning Zanzibar City of Amsterdam African Studies Centre Leiden Creative Industries Fund ​ Relevant links ​ ​ ​ tags #urban planning #intangible heritage #immaterial culture #placemaking #GO-HUL #finding stories #mapping Relevant projects Ng’ambo Tuitakayo Finding Stories Ng’ambo Housing Research Learning from Casablanca Ng’ambo atlas. Historic Urban Landscape of Zanzibar Town’s ‘Other Side’ ​ Ng’ambo Atlas is the concluding chapter of the Ng’ambo Tuitakayo Project undertaken by the Department of Urban and Rural Planning in Zanzibar and African Architecture Matters, in collaboration with the City of Amsterdam between 2012 and 2016. ​ The goal of the project was to prepare a local area plan (structure plan) for the new city centre of Zanzibar’s capital. From the beginning, our planning exercises were grounded in the notions of urban culture and heritage, while the principles outlined in the UNESCO Recommendation on Historic Urban Landscape provided us with a framework for the subsequent stages of our work. ​ It did not take much time before we realized that the cultural and historic richness of Stone Town’s ‘Other Side’ merited a wider recognition than a technical planning document would allow for. For this reason we decided to collect our findings in an atlas – a format that on the one hand enabled us to bring together and present Ng’ambo’s rich planning history through historic maps and plans, while on the other to draw attention to the outcomes of the mapping of the material and immaterial cultural landscape conducted during the project. ​ Ng’ambo is the lesser known ‘Other Side’ of Zanzibar Town. During the British Protectorate the area was designated as the ‘Native Quarters’, today it is set to become the new city centre of Zanzibar’s capital. Local and international perceptions of the cultural and historical importance of Ng’ambo have for a long time remained overshadowed by the social and cultural divisions created during colonial times. One thing is certain: despite its limited international fame and lack of recognition of its importance, Ng’ambo has played and continues to play a vital role in shaping the urban environment of Zanzibar Town. Ng’ambo atlas presents over hundred years of Ng’ambo’s history and urban development through maps, plans, surveys and images, and provides insights into its present-day cultural landscape through subjects such as architecture, toponymy, cultural activities, public recreation, places for social interaction, handcrafts and urban heritage. ​ The Atlas was launched on the 24th of January 2019 in the Klein Auditorium, Academy Building, of Leiden University in the Netherlands, and on the 13th of July 2019 in the Hifadhi building on Kiponda street, in Zanzibar Tanzania. ​ The Atlas is published by LM Publishers and can be ordered via their website. It is also available online in digital format through the website of the African Studies Centre Leiden, . here ​ The research, production and publication has been made possible through the generous support from the Netherlands Enterprise Agency, the Creative Industries Fund NL, the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Dar es Salaam, EFL Foundation and the City of Amsterdam. back to the projects overview

  • International Forum on Cultural Spaces in Kigali

    International Forum on Cultural Spaces in Kigali October 28, 2019 by AAmatters In March this year Rwanda Arts Initiative (RAI) in collaboration with BOZAR (B) and AAmatters organised the International Forum on Cultural Spaces in Kigali, Rwanda. The forum brought together local cultural, public and private sectors as well as international experts and representatives from cultural spaces in Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon, DRC and more, to discuss an action plan to improve the cultural infrastructure in Kigali and Rwanda, at large. In connection with the forum and for further inspiration, an international student workshop was organised to develop adaptive reuse proposals for the Kigali Central Prison and the Ecole Belge. Both sites have recently been abandoned and are in perfect locations for multi-purpose cultural spaces. Students from the University of Rwanda, Uganda Martyrs University and the University of Cape Town worked day and night to feed the discussions with their bright ideas. As a follow up to the forum RAI is currently working together with AAmatters and Laura Nsengiyumva on the mapping of cultural spaces in Kigali. A publication on the event and mapping will be available in 2020. The Innovation Village in Kigali compiled an insightful video on the event, which you can watch . here Tags: Culture Kigali mapping forum cultural spaces Event Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Please reload Featured Playing Mahonda – High Rise wishes? October 28, 2019 The long anticipated Ng’ambo Atlas is finally out! January 30, 2019 International Forum on Cultural Spaces in Kigali October 28, 2019 1/8 Please reload Recent news International Forum on Cultural Spaces in Kigali October 28, 2019 Playing Mahonda – High Rise wishes? October 28, 2019 Please reload related Inclusive urban development at the UN Habitat governing council meeting in Nairobi April 11, 2013 Brainstorm and recommendations for an African Urban Agenda April 7, 2014 1/2 Please reload Search By CAtegories Publication (8) Research (6) Event (19) Exhibition (11) Presentation (16) Education (4) Consultancy (1) Community (4) Workshop (4) Urban planning (5) Please reload Search By Tags Algeria Amsterdam Anthropology Architecture Biennale Book Books Casablanca Chandigarh Conference Culture Education Event Historic Urban Landscape Intangible Heritage Interdisciplinary Kigali Library Maputo Participatory Placemaking Planning Presentation Publication Research Seminar Seoul Unesco Urban Urban Development Urban Planning Urban Studies Urban planning Workshop Zanzibar affordable housing art conference cultural spaces education exhibition forum future heritage heritage_management lecture magazine mapping network public space shared space tropical architecture Please reload Archive Select Month October 2019 (5) August 2019 (1) March 2019 (2) February 2019 (1) January 2019 (2) September 2018 (1) March 2018 (1) February 2018 (3) November 2017 (1) October 2017 (1) September 2017 (1) August 2017 (1) April 2017 (1) February 2017 (1) November 2016 (1) September 2016 (1) July 2016 (2) May 2016 (1) April 2016 (2) February 2016 (2) January 2016 (3) December 2015 (3) November 2015 (1) October 2015 (1) September 2015 (1) July 2015 (1) June 2015 (4) February 2015 (2) January 2015 (1) November 2014 (1) September 2014 (1) August 2014 (1) May 2014 (2) April 2014 (4) February 2014 (2) December 2013 (1) October 2013 (1) September 2013 (1) April 2013 (4) February 2013 (1) January 2013 (2) November 2012 (1) October 2012 (1) September 2012 (1) August 2012 (1) June 2012 (3) May 2012 (3) February 2012 (1) January 2012 (2) November 2011 (7) October 2011 (2) August 2011 (1) July 2011 (1) June 2011 (5) April 2011 (2) March 2011 (1) February 2011 (2) January 2011 (1) November 2010 (1) October 2010 (5) September 2010 (1) June 2010 (1) March 2010 (1) Please reload JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER! Subscribe to our mailing list for news and updates Follow Us

  • Home | aamatters

    RESEARCH & ACTION CENTRE ON THE AFRICAN BUILT ENVIRONMENT AAmatters is a non-profit consultancy firm working in the fields of design, planning, research and education. AAmatters is at the forefront of thinking on pressing challenges regarding architecture and urbanism, such as sustainable development and the role of cultural heritage in the African context. AAmatters relies on a multi-disciplinary collective with over 30 years of experience in design, construction, education, academic research and activism. read more AAM projects meet the aam team AAM network Featuring News Playing Mahonda – High Rise wishes? October 28, 2019 The long anticipated Ng’ambo Atlas is finally out! January 30, 2019 International Forum on Cultural Spaces in Kigali October 28, 2019 1/8 Please reload Recent news International Forum on Cultural Spaces in Kigali October 28, 2019 Please reload Search By CAtegories Publication (8) Research (6) Event (19) Exhibition (11) Presentation (16) Education (4) Consultancy (1) Community (4) Workshop (4) Urban planning (5) Please reload Search By Tags Algeria Amsterdam Anthropology Architecture Biennale Book Books Casablanca Chandigarh Conference Culture Education Event Historic Urban Landscape Intangible Heritage Interdisciplinary Kigali Library Maputo Participatory Placemaking Planning Presentation Publication Research Seminar Seoul Unesco Urban Urban Development Urban Planning Urban Studies Urban planning Workshop Zanzibar affordable housing art conference cultural spaces education exhibition forum future heritage heritage_management lecture magazine mapping network public space shared space tropical architecture Please reload Featuring projects Ng’ambo Atlas After the completion of the Ng’ambo Tuitakayo project, the collected material during the mapping phase appeared so rich, that together BLUEPRINT FOR MAJESTIC CINEMA CULTURE HUB The history of cinema in Zanzibar goes back to the early 20th century. In its heydays the island was home to three permanent movie theatres Uganda Museum ‘Keeping It Modern’ AAmatters forms part of the project team of the Uganda Museum ‘Keeping It Modern’ project aiming at developing a conservation Show More

  • Coen Beeker | aamatters

    Coen Beeker seminar, publication and exhibition CategorY , , Event Publication Exhibition ​ Period 2016 - 2017 ​ AAmatters team Antoni Folkers Iga Perzyna Antie Kaan Alexandra Papadaki Berend van der Lans ​ Partners /Collaborators African Studies Centre Leiden University of Amsterdam Delft University of Technology Institute for Housing and Urban Development Studies Rotterdam Creative Industries Fund ​ Relevant links Order book ​ tags #exhibition #debate #urbanism #urban planning #placemaking #bottom up Relevant projects Institut fur Tropenbau Modern Architecture in Africa Ng’ambo Tuitakayo ​ Coen Beeker is an unsung pioneer in bottom-up and participatory approach to urban planning with over 40 years of experience in Africa. During an international seminar on 23 March 2017, organized in partnership with the African Studies Centre Leiden, the work and thought of Beeker was celebrated. A retrospective glance at his achievements and their benefits for contemporary and future urban planners was taken. The seminar featured speakers from Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Zanzibar & the Netherlands. Also a travelling exhibition on Coen Beeker, Urban Fields: Coen Beeker at Work in the African City and a book The Beeker Method. Planning and Working on the Redevelopment of the African City: Retrospective Glances into the Future were launched. The book includes contributions from scholars and practitioners from Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Zanzibar and the Netherlands and is available through the web shop of the African Studies Centre. ​ The exhibition travels to the University of Amsterdam, the Institute for Housing and Urban Development Studies in Rotterdam, Delft University of Technology and the Canadian Centre for Architecture after the presentation in Leiden. ​ The name of Coen Beeker may be unfamiliar to many; however, with increasing interest in urban Africa and the topic of urban planning on the continent, Beeker and his extensive work in several African countries deserves a more critical look. ​ Beeker’s work focused primarily on urban redevelopment projects in Ethiopia, Tunisia, Sudan and Burkina Faso, of which his involvement in the modernization process of Ouagadougou is perhaps the most notable. Beeker applied an approach to urban planning that was not only ahead of its time, but which has also proved highly successful. The Beeker Method, as we would like to call it, is, in essence, about redevelopment carried out by residents themselves, through a dynamic process of palavers and long community consultations, and planning and site work conducted with little interference from above. ​ The importance of community participation has been widely acknowledged in the current urban planning discourse. It is considered a fundamental prerequisite to fair and representative decision making in contemporary urban planning practices and the democratization of a process that was once in the hands of experts. Although there is considerable interest on the part of authorities and practitioners working in developing countries to apply bottom-up and participatory approaches, involvement of the poor and often disadvantaged groups in these processes remains difficult to achieve. ​ This contemporary reassessment of Beeker’s projects and the underlying principles of his approach aims to contribute to the current debate on urban planning in Africa. ​ Speakers on the seminar were among others Coen Beeker (University of Amsterdam), Joseph Guiébo (Former director of the Direction Générale de l’Urbanisme et de la Topographie, Ouagadougou and UN Habitat expert), Muhammad Juma (Director of the Department of Urban and Rural Planning, Zanzibar), Gilbert Kibtonré (Secretary General of the Ministry of Lands and Developemnts in Burkina Faso), Yolande Lingané (Direction Générale de l'Urbanisme et de la Topographie, Burkina Faso), Anteneh Tesfaye Tola (Doctoral Candidate, TU Delft). Document available for download in the AAmatters online Library . back to the projects overview

  • Michenzani Green Corridors | aamatters

    Michenzani Green Corridors CategorY , , Urban planning community consultancy ​ Period 2016 ​ AAmatters team Antoni Folkers Alexandra Papadaki ​ Partners /Collaborators DoURP Roland Raderschall Ruwan Aluvihare World Bank ​ Relevant links ​ ​ ​ tags #urban planning #public space #placemaking #green corridor Relevant projects Ng’ambo Tuitakayo Ng’ambo Atlas During the process of the Ng’ambo Tuitakayo project in Zanzibar it became apparent that the development of the Karume and Mlandege Road form a key step into the redevelopment of Ng’ambo – an area that is also designated as the new city centre in the new metropolitan structure plan. The World Bank recognised the potential as well and made reservations for restructuring these important axes in the area. AAmatters, together with the Department of Urban and Rural Planning from the Government of Zanzibar and the consultants Ruwan Aluvihare and Roland Raderschall, developed a preliminary design that was adopted for further tendering and is now in the process of being prepared for execution. The project also involved training of the staff of DoURP. back to the projects overview

  • it | aamatters

    ivan thung During those months I felt like we planted a seed somewhere between the Michenzani Blocks. It makes me feel really excited to see that the seed seems to start growing into a plant! a Steven Zijlstra (28), holding a Master’s degree (ir./MSc.) in Real Estate and Housing from the Delft University of Technology. After my graduation in 2015 I had the chance to work on the housing research at AA Matters. Since June 2015, I work at Diepenhorst de Vos and Partners in The Hague as a project manager / (delegated) project developer. My main focus lies on the redevelopment of shopping center Colmschate, Deventer (Holland). I am passionate about redevelopment projects in a complex context, to improve that context while representing the desires of the client. My field of expertise is project (re)development, project management and real estate finance. projects involved Housing Strategies in a Historic Urban Landscape I researched the housing strategies and did a feasibility study to densify the Neighbourhood of Ng’ambo while respecting its tangible and intangible heritage, which eventually resulted in the Ng’ambo Housing Action Plan. I really enjoyed my time in Zanzibar and Tanzania. Great and dedicated people, good fun. During those months I felt like we planted a seed somewhere between the Michenzani Blocks. It makes me feel really excited to see that the seed seems to start growing into a plant! Another moment I can remember and cherish was the signing session of the shareholder meeting of Hifadhi Zanzibar. A big moment and such a good initiative for Zanzibar City. back to the team overview

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